David Bowie Shapeshifting Comparison "Kidomaru" (Aladdin Sane) Ukiyo-e

David Bowie Shapeshifting Comparison "Kidomaru" (Aladdin Sane) Ukiyo-e

David Bowie x Ukiyo-e Project

In homage to the artist and his relationship with Japan.

Understanding the special connection that David Bowie had with Japan, his love for Japanese culture, and the creative relationship with Japan that formed from his early years, it has been suggested that David Bowie’s Ziggie Stardust look was inspired by the Japanese Kabuki theatre aesthetic, along with his kimono fashion, and with numerous other examples of the close creative relationship that he had with Japan.

"Kidomaru" is a legendary Japanese sorcerer that is commonly featured as the subject of Ukiyo-e during the Kamakura Period in stories such as "Kokonchomonjyo" and "Shitennoshoutouiroku" from "Kyokuteibakin". This artwork portrays a cross between savage Kidomaru managing snake and Bowie glowing with subtle and mystic power.

Since the Aladdin Sane image has a white base, the artist has made the kimono in white. A popular figure at the time, most historical ukiyo-e that feature Kidomaru are set at night, and so he has depicted the background in black gradation.

Craftsmen: Ukiyo-e creation requires three highly skilled artisans

Illustrator: Masumi Ishikawa
Wood Carver: Nami Sato
Printer: Makoto Nakayama

Limited Edition
As the prints are all handmade, and to maintain the finest quality, only 200 prints will be made.
Size: 18.9 x 13.4inches (48 x 34cm)

Ukiyo-e is unframed, and presented in a specially designed folio made specifically for the David Bowie Ukiyo-e series.

Due to the nature of this hand-produced art form, colors and lines may vary in intensity between prints. This creates the uniqueness of each print and therefore allows everyone to have their own experience.


Material:

Washi, traditionally hand-made Japanese Paper “Echizen kizuki housho”.

In addition to the illustrator, woodcarver, and printer, there is an additional craftsman behind the scenes. This “Echizen kizuki housho” is made by Shouhachi Yamaguchi in Fukui Prefecture. This Washi maker in Fukui has a history of 1500 years. Washi was used for preserving documents in the age of the samurai. The Washi is made of all natural fibers from the mulberry tree, allowing it to be very durable.
Ukiyo-e would not have its form unless the Artisans had this Washi paper. There are only 2 Washi craftsmen left to make this Echizen kizuki housho, and our provider is a certified national treasure of Japan.


Edition Numbering:
Each print will have an edition number. The numbers are chosen randomly.


Maintenance and Preservation:
Over time, the color will fade, which is part of the Ukiyo-e experience. Keep the Ukiyo-e out of direct sunlight, strong ultraviolet sources, and high humidity. Once the art is received, remove the folio from the plastic sheathe to allow it to breath.


The artisans' woodblock print techniques are recognized by the Japanese government as an "Important Ethnic Cultural Asset and Technique Selected for Preservation” under the Cultural Affairs Protection Act.

*Please try to avoid placing the Ukiyo-e in direct sunlight. It is natural for the color to fade or change with time, and these natural changes can be enjoyed, but it is recommended to keep the art in dry and stable conditions in order to best preserve the original colors.

David Bowie Shapeshifting Comparison "Takezawa Toji" (Diamond Dogs) Ukiyo-e

David Bowie Shapeshifting Comparison "Takezawa Toji" (Diamond Dogs) Ukiyo-e

David Bowie x Ukiyo-e Project

In homage to the artist and his relationship with Japan.

Understanding the special connection that David Bowie had with Japan, his love for Japanese culture, and the creative relationship with Japan that formed from his early years, it has been suggested that David Bowie’s Ziggie Stardust look was inspired by the Japanese Kabuki theatre aesthetic, along with his kimono fashion, and with numerous other examples of the close creative relationship that he had with Japan.

Takezawa Toji II is a popular magician with many tricks and gimmicks during the Edo Period.

As an entertainer, in a way an illusionist, it is thought that Bowie has a high affinity. The work resembles the dog from "Diamond Dogs" as a nine-tailed fox being the subject of the act, and portrays Bowie as Toji spinning a top.

Although the original photo is presented in black and white, the eyepatch David Bowie wore was red and black, as is his clothing. Thus, the artist has decided to use these colors, but in sepia to change the overall tone. Also, he has laid a black smoke screen in the background.. He feels they have a strong impact, and this color adjustment can also be appreciated by David Bowie fans.

Craftsmen: Ukiyo-e creation requires three highly skilled artisans

Illustrator: Masumi Ishikawa
Wood Carver: Yusuke Sekioka
Printer: Tatsuya Ito

Limited Edition
As the prints are all handmade, and to maintain the finest quality, only 200 prints will be made.
Size: 18.9 x 13.4inches (48 x 34cm)

Ukiyo-e is unframed, and presented in a specially designed folio made specifically for the David Bowie Ukiyo-e series.

Due to the nature of this hand-produced art form, colors and lines may vary in intensity between prints. This creates the uniqueness of each print and therefore allows everyone to have their own experience.


Material:

Washi, a traditionally hand-made Japanese Paper “Echizen kizuki housho”.

In addition to the illustrator, woodcarver, and printer, there is an additional craftsman behind the scenes. This “Echizen kizuki housho” is made by Shouhachi Yamaguchi in Fukui Prefecture. This Washi maker in Fukui has a history of 1500 years. Washi was used for preserving documents in the age of the samurai. The Washi is made of all natural fibers from the mulberry tree, allowing it to be very durable.
Ukiyo-e would not have its form unless the Artisans had this Washi paper. There are only 2 Washi craftsmen left to make this Echizen kizuki housho, and our provider is a certified national treasure of Japan.


Edition Numbering:
Each print will have an edition number. The numbers are chosen randomly.


Maintenance and Preservation:
Over time, the color will fade, which is part of the Ukiyo-e experience. Keep the Ukiyo-e out of direct sunlight, strong ultraviolet sources, and high humidity. Once the art is received, remove the folio from the plastic sheathe to allow it to breath.


The artisans' woodblock print techniques are recognized by the Japanese government as an "Important Ethnic Cultural Asset and Technique Selected for Preservation” under the Cultural Affairs Protection Act.

*Please try to avoid placing the Ukiyo-e in direct sunlight. It is natural for the color to fade or change with time, and these natural changes can be enjoyed, but it is recommended to keep the art in dry and stable conditions in order to best preserve the original colors.